RegTech Intelligence

Legislative initiative: Capital Requirements Directive IV (CRD IV)

It has been nearly four years since the implementation of CRR/CRD IV which cover prudential rules for banks, building societies and investment firms with the main aim of reducing the likelihood that these financial institutions will become insolvent.  To an extent, this reflects the Basel III rules on capital measurement and capital standards which is


The sheer number of overlapping regulatory reporting regimes makes compliance difficult. MiFID II, which comes into effect in January 2018, significantly expands the scope of transaction reporting. EMIR, which is a reporting regime for derivative transactions under the EU regulation on OTC derivatives, CCPs and trade repositories, came into effect on 10 April 2014. Reporting


On 23 November 2016, the European Commission published its proposal for a comprehensive reform package aimed at continuing risk reduction and to further strengthen resilience across the European banking system.  Included within these proposals are amendments to the current capital requirements (CRR/CRD) and resolution framework (BRRD/SRM). The Capital Requirements Regulation (CRR) and Directive (CRD IV,


In a week which has seen cyber-risk cement itself on the agendas of regulators across the world, we’ve witnessed action in the trading space with plenty of developments occurring in Europe’s markets in financial instruments’ overhaul, as well as a concerted effort to rethink the way in which regulations and regulators work in the financial services industry.


In the post-Easter week, regulators were busy shining a spotlight on remuneration practices in the industry.  We saw the EBA releasing a report looking at the high earners in EU banks and ESMA focusing on sound remuneration policies under the UCITS Directive and AIFMD. The FSB also met in Tokyo to discuss their priorities for


This week, the EU commission published the responses to their call for information on the impact of EU regulation so far.  The FCA’s response, also published this week, has been similar to other feedback in citing the constraints on both the banks and the real economy of financing themselves, overly complex reporting obligations and spill-over


Following the announcement of a landmark deal on international cooperation over tax avoidance last week, Tuesday saw the signing of a transatlantic pact on data transfer.  Even when the EU are in the process of stocktaking the cumulative effects of regulation so far, there is clearly no break in the ongoing pace of financial markets


After a long week at Davos, there are a number of interesting conclusions from this year’s World Economic Forum.  China appears to have come out less of a worry than it was when it went in, with the IMF’s Christine Lagarde stating that the country is going through a transitional stage towards sustainable growth, and


Over the last week, regulators have been signalling that they will not be tolerating risky or illegal finance in 2016 any more than in the previous year.  Margin requirements are back on the table, along with bankers’ remuneration and fines – plenty of fines.  Despite this, the inquiry into the UK FCA’s scrapped banking review


Financial regulation remains as complex as ever. Complex new niches such as shadow banking, Fintech, and Over-the-Counter Derivatives, and the increasing interconnectedness of Financial Institutions (FIs) across the world, have led to greater risks to be managed for regulators. With this in mind, how they manage to get ahead of these rapid financial evolutions and