On 18 August 2016, the Financial Stability Board (FSB) published two final guidance papers for authorities and firms as part of the agenda to end the “too big to fail” risk. Some progress is being made, and the FSB has said that “banks have begun to develop issuance strategies to meet new total loss-absorbing capacity


Benchmarks and indices are vital tools for assessing the underlying price of financial instruments and contracts as well as for measuring the performance of investment funds.  Despite this, recent LIBOR and EURIBOR scandals have exposed how vulnerable to manipulation these instruments are.  In the light of these events, the European Commission produced a benchmark regulation, which


Several large Wall Street banks, including Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, and J.P. Morgan, have requested five more years to comply with the Volcker rule, in order to sell their holdings which will become more difficult to sell as the summer deadline moves closer.  If their request is accepted, it will give them until 2022 to


The Global Financial Markets Association (GFMA), a banking lobby, has warned regulators that new rules must be closely examined to assess their impact on the global financial markets. This comes as a result of the proposed changes to capital requirements that the Basel Committee is currently implementing. These changes to capital requirements could have a


On 25 May, the Financial Stability Board (FSB) reported on jurisdictional progress in implementing their policy framework for strengthening oversight and regulation of shadow banking entities. Shadow banking emerged as a financial stability priority following the events of the financial crisis in 2008, when a number of non-bank financial entities entered into liquidation due to


The Fundamental Review of the Trading Book (FRTB) final text was published in January 2016 by the Basel Committee (BCBS).  The aims of the FRTB BCBS standards are to better factor market risk into trading book risk models, and to prevent banks moving instruments between the trading book and the banking book in order to


In a week which has seen cyber-risk cement itself on the agendas of regulators across the world, we’ve witnessed action in the trading space with plenty of developments occurring in Europe’s markets in financial instruments’ overhaul, as well as a concerted effort to rethink the way in which regulations and regulators work in the financial services industry.


On 1 April 2016, the European Commission’s Delegated Regulation (EU) 2016/467 relating to Solvency II – the European risk-based capital regime – was published into the Official Journal of the EU.  This covers the new risk charges imposed on insurers’ equity and debt investment in infrastructure projects. Based on advice from the European Insurance and


In the post-Easter week, regulators were busy shining a spotlight on remuneration practices in the industry.  We saw the EBA releasing a report looking at the high earners in EU banks and ESMA focusing on sound remuneration policies under the UCITS Directive and AIFMD. The FSB also met in Tokyo to discuss their priorities for


This week, the EU commission published the responses to their call for information on the impact of EU regulation so far.  The FCA’s response, also published this week, has been similar to other feedback in citing the constraints on both the banks and the real economy of financing themselves, overly complex reporting obligations and spill-over