It has been nearly four years since the implementation of CRR/CRD IV which cover prudential rules for banks, building societies and investment firms with the main aim of reducing the likelihood that these financial institutions will become insolvent.  To an extent, this reflects the Basel III rules on capital measurement and capital standards which is


Fitch Ratings, one of the largest three credit rating agencies, released a report on 11 September 2016 on how the Reserve Bank of India’s (RBI) increase in capital requirements under Basel III is likely to put nearly half of Indian banks in danger of breaching capital triggers. They emphasised that government owned banks are the


JWG analysis. This month the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation published a proposal amending the Annual Stress Test rule. The Annual Stress Test rule, originally published in October 2012, requires that non-member banks and FDIC insured state-chartered savings associations with total consolidated assets of more than $10 billion conduct annual stress tests. The proposed amendment to


JWG analysis. On Tuesday, 15 April the European Parliament approved several new reforms to manage banking sector risk and ensure that shareholders, not taxpayers, pick up the tab for the next crisis. Now the political work is done, the MEPs are busy campaigning, and it’s up to the industry and ESAs to work out how


JWG analysis. The Fed made some concessions in timing and scope, but pressed ahead with measures to insulate the US financial sector from future bailouts earlier this week.  The news stoked fears that European regulators may look to reciprocate, triggering a race to the highest common denominator when it comes to determining capital buffers, and potentially


Out of the shadows, into the rulebooks?

Shadow banking could soon force infrastructure upgrades and additional business costs– will the industry find ways to ease the pain? As repos, securities and, potentially, CCPs become part of the transparency agenda via new shadow banking regulation, this could result in infrastructure upgrades and increased business costs looking set to be on their way in


RRPs: Operational deluge coming soon for FMIs

With the world’s most systemic banks having made it through the first round of invasive living wills in 2012, regulators now have their sights on the Financial Market Infrastructure (FMI). Central Counterparties (CCPs), payments systems and exchanges will have a lot to do in 2013 and could do well to heed some lessons from their


A common roadmap for Europe?

Finally, after months of anticipation, European Commission President José-Manuel Barroso outlined his “decisive deal”: a big picture vision of an ideal, sound roadmap for Europe’s financial future. The EC proposes to create a single supervisory mechanism for banks in the euro area – starting on 1 January 2013. Under the proposals the European Central Bank


OTC: Will your firm make the grade?

The G20 says OTC regulation was to be finalised by end 2012. But, with at least 34,000 more pages of regulation expected by 2016 from the US alone, firms need to upgrade their BAU. Following the G20’s meeting in April 2009, the pathforward for regulation on OTC derivatives seemed clear. In the shadow of the


Systemically Important Financial Institutions

SIFI assessment criteria are becoming increasingly stratified and are coming to financial institutions near you. Higher capital surcharges, ring fencing, ‘unplugging’ and new living will reports are all parts of a solution to combat ‘too big to fail.’ Some economists contend that the banks that are too-big-to-fail enjoy a lower cost of capital because they