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Good for firms, bad for supervision – EBA publishes CRD IV reporting ITS
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01 Aug
2013

Good for firms, bad for supervision – EBA publishes CRD IV reporting ITS

  • 1st August 2013
  • RegTechFS

The European Banking Authority (EBA) has finally published its final draft Implementing Technical Standards (ITS) (here) on supervisory reporting for CRD IV. Long awaited, the technical standards set out the near-final reporting requirements, as part of COREP, for own funds, financial information, losses stemming from lending collateralised by immovable property, large exposures, leverage ratio and Read More

18 Jun
2013

Risk data aggregation: forming the view from nowhere

Without a consolidated viewpoint on what new risk data requirements mean, firms will be at a loss when it comes to determining best practice. The deadline for firms to upgrade their risk data aggregation capabilities is fast approaching. The Basel Committee for Banking Supervision’s Principles for Risk Data Aggregation and Risk Reporting are due to Read More

26 Apr
2013

The LEI: From interim identifiers to a global standard

  • 26th April 2013
  • RegTechFS

Recently, CFTC Commissioner Scott O’Malia issued a blistering condemnation of the lack of data standards within financial services regulation: “the Commission told the industry what information to report, but didn’t specify which language to use. This has become a serious problem…. nobody should be under the illusion that promulgation of the reporting rules will enhance Read More

12 Mar
2013

Will an EU interim identifier be available in time for EMIR reporting?

  • 12th March 2013
  • RegTechFS

The newly formed LEI ‘Regulatory Oversight Committee’ (ROC) has released its first progress note. In the time between its formation, the election of members and the handover from the Financial Stability Board (FSB) in January this year, the ROC has been making significant progress. The newly formed LEI ‘Regulatory Oversight Committee’ (ROC) has released its Read More

26 Feb
2013

The LEI: between a ROC and hard decisions

  • 26th February 2013
  • RegTechFS

As the global method of identifying entities and their ownership structures, the Legal Entity Identifier forms a central part of the G20’s crisis-prevention toolbox. After a few chaotic years of LEI debate and design, regulators are finally nearing the long anticipated starting line for use of the world’s first singular identifier. The LEI is of Read More

30 Jan
2013

Shadow banking: it all starts with data

In November 2012, the FSB published its proposals for regulating the shadow banking sector – and in particular the repos/securities lending market – in two consultation papers, collectively titled: ‘Policy Framework for Strengthening Oversight and Regulation of Shadow Banking Entities’. These papers are fundamental in setting the tone for the global shadow banking regime, including Read More

28 Jan
2013

The Legal Entity Identifier (LEI): the ROC has landed

After months of being in the works, the Regulatory Oversight Committee (ROC) for the global FSB has come into being. The ROC is responsible for “upholding the governance principles of and to oversee the global LEI system … in accordance with the High Level Principles and recommendations set out in June 2012” by the FSB. In Read More

07 Dec
2012

EU leading data hub charge where US left off

New, prescriptive EU clearing obligation rules will require new counterparty classification and monitoring systems. Is this a standard data hub opportunity? With EMIR having entered into force on 16 August 2012, and the release of final draft technical standards by ESMA in September, firms will soon be facing rules on clearing obligations and eligible counterparty Read More

01 Oct
2012

Interim identifiers face EU brick wall

  • 1st October 2012
  • RegTechFS

After Level 1 of EMIR got the industry thinking they would be allowed to use the LEI or another ‘interim’ identifier, they hit somewhat of a brick wall. ESMA’s long awaited final draft technical standards for EMIR have dealt a serious blow to ‘interim solutions’ already being used, stating that any interim solutions need to be in Read More