The State of Holistic Trade Surveillance – JWG research published 

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By PJ Di Giammarino Over the past few years, financial services firms have been investigating how to improve trade-related surveillance capabilities and techniques. Expectations from regulators and senior management have been placed under the microscope, mainly due to high surveillance noise levels across all communication channels and asset classes. In tracking this evolution of technologies


On 23rd April, the Bank of England took over the administration of the benchmark rate known as SONIA (Sterling Overnight Index Average), and issued a series of reforms to the well-established benchmark as part of its implementation as a replacement to LIBOR. As a consequence of the LIBOR scandal in 2012, a Bank of England


In our previous article Trade Surveillance: restructuring the business landscape[1] we identified how holistic regulatory requirements are forcing banks to re-consider the makeup of their operational structures. Our follow-up research has revealed the severity of the situation and how the industry is reacting too slowly. Trade surveillance, if not executed correctly, can result in financial


JWG analysis. When the requirement brought about by the German high frequency trading act to tag algorithms comes into force in April of this year, market participants may well feel hamstrung by the complexity of the regime.  And while the regulatory goal of improving market surveillance and reducing systemic risk may be valid, some might


The UK’s Foresight Commission report on HFT has finally heard the industry’s call for clear, shared data standards across the financial system. However, it remains to be seen whether Europe – or the world – has the stomach to realise this vision. After a series of dramatic computer trading glitches across the globe, most recently


A long road from theory to policy

The industry has been waiting for the “high-level” opinions of the Liikanen Report, and its prescriptions for reform of the turbulent European banking sector.  The reforms, while suggestions rather than binding Policy (as Barnier continues to remind everyone) call for huge changes to how European banks operate. The biggest development of these is a Volcker-style


HFT: On the brink of definitive new controls?

Thanks to technological hiccup after technological hiccup, High Frequency Trading (HFT) remains a permanent fixture in the financial press. With each blip, regulators and politicians promise to regulate HFT, but how they are going to put effective controls in place is still an open question. Despite the noise, the issues with HFT remain the same.